Tag Archives: celebration

Photo competition – International students: changing lives

International students: changing livesTo celebrate UKCISA‘s 50th year of supporting international students, they’re inviting you to enter a photo competition to show some of the excitement, achievements and surprises you’ve faced and how studying in the UK can change lives. They’re welcoming photographs that illustrate any aspect of studying in the UK. Themes include excitement, challenges, hopes for the future and surprises. A full list and further details are available at https://ukcisa.org.uk/competition

How do I enter?

Submit a photo and accompanying statement about what the image represents and how it demonstrates life in the UK as an international student. The photo must be the original file (to ensure printable quality) and in landscape format. Send us your entry by 5pm on 30th October 2017. Those judged to be the best 12 will be featured in a 2018 printed calendar to be sent to all of UKCISA’s university and college members.

The 12 winners will also receive:

  • a £50 Amazon voucher
  • a copy of the calendar
  • a ‘UKCISA Certificate of Commendation’
  • an invitation to our anniversary reception event in 2018 (date TBC)

The best 50 photos and stories will be featured on ukcisa.org.uk throughout 2018. Read the full details and enter!

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Spending Christmas in the UK

Mince pies and crackers

This month’s guest post is by Matt Powell from Broadband Genie and describes what a traditional Christmas in the UK is like. Matt also discusses how the internet can help you stay connected to your family at this time of year.

Christmas in the UK comes with many well-loved traditions. Children open their Advent calendars (who doesn’t love getting to legitimately eat chocolate first thing in the morning?), families put up trees and decorate their houses, schools perform nativity plays and people gather in town and city centres to watch the Christmas lights being switched on.

Many children will leave out a plate of mince pies for Santa and carrots for his reindeer on Christmas Eve; it’s also traditional for their parents to eat them once the children are asleep so that in the morning it looks like Santa really has been! Many people will also attend Midnight Mass at church on Christmas Eve.

Christmas morning (the 25th December in the UK) generally begins with excited kids waking early and opening the stockings that have been filled with presents for them; the kitchen downstairs, meanwhile, will soon start to get busy as the turkey goes in the oven and people help peel potatoes and carrots.

The presents under the tree are usually shared out and opened, new toys are played with and later everybody sits down to Christmas lunch. Turkey, stuffing, roast potatoes, vegetables and gravy are the traditional items on the plate but every family has its own favourite extras that will be added too.

Afterwards there might be Christmas pudding (complete with flaming brandy), Christmas cake and, if you’re still not quite completely full, mince pies. And Christmas lunch wouldn’t be the same without everyone pulling crackers, wearing paper hats and groaning at the terrible jokes inside.

At 3pm you might find people gathered around the television watching the Queen’s Speech being broadcast and on Boxing Day (26th December) everyone takes part in yet another British tradition: eating up all of yesterday’s leftover food!

Christmas in the UK is very much about being together with family and friends and if you’re living overseas at this time of year it can be hard. Obviously, nothing is the same as actually being with your loved ones but if you are unable to cross continents to spend Christmas at home then the internet can certainly help you feel closer.

Emails are great for sharing news and writing long messages. Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or your country’s preferred social media site can be used to share photos and updates of what you’ve been doing / seeing during the Christmas break from your studies. You can also use apps like WhatsApp to send free text messages across the world in real time.

However, the best way of feeling connected to your family has to be a video call. It can make you feel much closer to people far away and it’s perfect at this time of year if your family are celebrating Christmas so you can really feel part of the festive fun. Even if you are not celebrating Christmas, a video call home at the year’s end is a great way to stay in touch.

Apple users can talk to each other via FaceTime on their iPhones and iPads. Then there’s Skype, Google Hangouts and Viber (for example) for people using other devices. And using the group call function on these services means that even if your family are spread out across the world you can all join in the conversation at the same time, with everybody talking at once. Just like being at home!

If you have a question related to academic life and study in the UK and you can’t find the answer in the Prepare for Success learning resources, write it on the Question Wall and we will try to answer it here in the blog next time.

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Graduation day!

GraduationThis week’s blogpost is in answer to a student’s question about the end of study on their Master’s degree programme and the graduation ceremony.

At the end of any course that you have successfully completed there is usually a celebration. In the case of an undergraduate or postgraduate degree programme, this often takes the form of a graduation ceremony.

This is an opportunity to dress up and celebrate your success. Students who are about to graduate (called ‘graduands’) hire a gown and mortarboard (headgear) to wear for the ceremony (see image). This is often accompanied by a sash or other item that is specific to the Faculty or university/college from which they are graduating.

The ceremony, which can last up to two hours, includes speeches. All graduating students, if present, are called to the main stage individually to receive their degree certificate.

Invited guests also attend the ceremony. These are often the parents, relatives and/or friends of the person graduating. There are opportunities for both formal photos – a professional photographer is normally available after the ceremony, and informal ones with family and friends.

Finally, everyone attends a drinks and canapés or similar reception with members of teaching staff to celebrate together. Graduation is an event to look forward to and one that will bring back lots of happy memories in the future.

If you have a question related to academic life and study in the UK and you can’t find the answer in the Prepare for Success learning resources, write it on the Question Wall and we will try to answer it here in the blog next time.

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